Connecting to SHAPE-based augmented spaces via QR codes or NFC


The SHAPE concept requires that a single standard SHAPE app works with any SHAPE installation without the user having to do anything particularly special. The first thing that the SHAPE app has to be able to do is to connect with an EdgeAccess instance (see the SHAPE architecture here), or two (primary and backup) if redundant operation is required. A simple way to do this is to use QR codes and this is now working in the macOS and iOS Unity SHAPE apps (with the help of the ZXing.Net QR code reader). The idea is that a customer entering a theme park or sports arena for example would be given a customized QR code that contains their assigned temporary user name and the URLs to primary and backup EdgeAccesses. The SHAPE app is then started and begins searching for a valid SHAPE QR code. When one is found, the SHAPE app connects to the specified EdgeAccess(es) and begins normal operation.

This mode of operation implies a system that creates the QR codes and is tied in to purchasing tickets which might not always be practical. An alternative to this is to have standard QR codes for the SHAPE installation that have URLs to a new SHAPE component called AccessManager. One or two AccessManagers (two for redundancy) serve the entire installation which means that one or more standard QR codes could be supplied to any customer. The first step for the app then is to connect to the AccessManager (using the URL from the QR code) which then redirects the SHAPE app to the assigned primary and backup EdgeAccesses instances. This allows for dynamic load sharing between EdgeAccess instances at connection time (rather than QR code generation time as in the customized QR code case).

However, there are advantages to generating customized QR codes for every customer. One advantage is that users can be added to groups easily. SHAPE augmentations can be defined to be visible only to members of a group. This means that a group could have private sticky notes left around the SHAPE installation for example. Or, a group assignment could define a specific version of information and augmentations for an event. As an example, if two teams are playing some sort of match in an arena, customers might want to identify with one of the teams and see customized information feeds and augmentations that are most relevant to them.

While QR codes work well, NFC might be a better way to go for real installations. If an AR headset uses a smartphone to run the SHAPE app, the smartphone’s NFC capability could be used to transfer the SHAPE connection information. Or if a headset is able to run the SHAPE app standalone and has an NFC capability, that could also be used.

SHAPE itself is working pretty well now with sticky notes and whiteboards (essentially as in rt-xr) working fine with collaboration and persistence. CoreUniverse, EdgeSpace, EdgeAccess and asset serving are all operational. The QR code system got rid of some of the temporary configuration – there are a few more temporary fixes left to be eliminated before the implementation becomes more generally usable.