Combining TrueDepth, remote OpenPose inference and local depth map processing to generate spatial 3D pose coordinates


The problem with depth maps for video is that the depth data is very large and can’t be compressed easily. I had previously run OpenPose at 30 FPS using an iPad Pro and remote inference but that was just for the standard OpenPose (x, y) coordinate output. There’s no way that 30 FPS could be achieved by sending out TrueDepth depth maps with each frame. Instead, the depth processing has to be handled locally on the iPad – the depth map never leaves the device.

The screen capture above shows the system running at 30 FPS. I had to turn a lot of lights on in the office – the frame rate from the iPad camera will drop below 30 FPS if it is too dark which messes up the data!


This is the design. It is the triple scaled OpenPoseGPU design used previously. iOSOpenPose connects to the Conductor via a websocket connection that is used to send images to and receive processed images from the pipeline.

One issue is that each image frame has its own depth map and that’s the one that has to be used to convert the OpenPose (x, y) coordinates into spatial (x, y, z) distances. The solution, in a new app called iOSOpenPose, is to cache the depth maps locally and re-associate them with the processed images when they return. Each image and depth frame is marked with a unique incrementing index to assist with this. Incidentally, this is why I love using JSON for this kind of work – it is possible to add non-standard fields at any point and they will be carried transparently to their destination.

Empirically with my current setup, there is a six frame processing lag which is not too bad. It would probably be better with the dual scaled pipeline, two node design that more easily handles 30 FPS but I did not try that. Another issue is that the processing pipeline can validly lose image frames if it can’t keep up with the offered rate. The depth map cache management software has to take care of all of the nasty details like this and other real-world effects.

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