Controlling the real world using Windows Mixed Reality, Manifold, rt-ai Edge and Insteon

Having now constructed a simple walk around model of my office and another room, it was time to start work on the interaction side of things. I have an Insteon switch controlling some of the lights in my office and this seemed like an obvious target. Manifold now has a home automation server app (HAServer) based on one from an earlier project. This allows individual Insteon devices to be addressed by user-friendly names using JSON over Manifold’s end to end datagram service. Light switches can now be specified in the Unity rtXRView space definition file and linked to the control interface of the HAServer.

The screen capture above and video below were made using a Samsung Odyssey headset and motion controllers. The light switch specification causes a virtual light switch to be placed, ideally exactly where the real light switch happens to be. Then, by pointing at the light switch with the motion controller and clicking, the light can be turned on and off. The virtual light switch is gray when the light is off and green when it is on. If the real switch is operated by some other means, the virtual light switch will reflect this as the HAServer broadcasts state change updates on a regular basis. It’s nice to see that the light sensor on the ZeroSensor responds appropriately to the light level too. Technically this light switch is a dimmer – setting an intermediate level is a TODO at this point.

An interesting aspect of this is the extent to which a remote VR user can get a sense of telepresence in a space, even if it is just a virtual representation of the real space. To make that connection more concrete, the virtual light in Unity should reflect the ambient light level as measured by the ZeroSensor. That’s another TODO…

While this is kind of fun in the VR world, it could actually be interesting in the AR world. If the virtual light switch is placed correctly but is invisible (apart from a collider), a HoloLens user (for example) could look at a real light switch and click in order to change the state of the switch. Very handy for the terminally lazy! More useful than just this would be to annotate the switch with what it controls. For some reason, people in this house never seem to know which light switch controls what so this feature by itself would be quite handy.

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